Construction nearing completion

Works are near completion on a two storey extension in Claydon, Suffolk. The project involved major updates to the layout of the old semi-detached property. The Client purchased the property as a three bedroom home; however two of the bedrooms were very small. The only toilet was downstairs in a lean-to extension to the rear and the kitchen was a very poor size.

The new layout includes three double bedrooms, with an en-suite to the master bedroom. The downstairs bathroom has been removed, relocating the downstairs toilet into a new front porch. This opens up the downstairs space to form an open plan kitchen/diner with bi-folding doors into the rear garden. The Client is extremely happy and looks forward to finishing the build.

Digger on site!

Works have commenced on a new side extension I have been working on in Denham. The footings have been inspected by building control who are happy with progress. The digger is shown here, struggling with the clay!

Denham

Side extension to existing house

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PLANNING PERMISSION

I am proud to announce that planning permission has just been granted for my design of a proposed front extension to a barn-style dwelling in Mellis. The extension will form additional kitchen and bedroom/en-suite space, providing the Clients with much needed space for their daughter.

Front extension elevation

Planning Permission

Suffolk barn-style dwelling achieves planning permission for front extension 

I'm Super Excited...

...about posting this one!

It's a first floor extension above a garage. Sounds simple, I know, but it makes the world of difference to this Framlingham property.

On a personal note I am particularly proud of this job, it was one of my first projects in my own firm, there were a few stumbling blocks with the planners and it's great to now see it finished. I'm really happy with the outcome, you can barely tell there is an extension there at all!

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First Floor Extension

The conversion of a garage space and addition of two bedrooms over, creating a larger family home in the form of a seamless extension

Henley Road - Curved Wall

Works are progressing well on the front extension at Henley Road. The bricklayers have done a very nice job of matching up the existing Flemish bond brickwork with the adjacent garage and formed a beautiful curve with header bricks. The extension appears seamless against the rest of the house. The windows are to be designed with the frames hidden within the brickwork to allow for as much light as possible to enter the room and will be specially made to fit the curve of the extension. A flat roof will be hidden beyond the parapet wall to blend in seamlessly with the roof of the existing garage. 

More information on my projects page

Works progressing - new dwelling, Kettleburgh

New house, Kettleburgh, Suffolk

Works are progressing on a new dwelling in Kettleburgh, for which I am Contract Manager and Principal Designer. The foundations and plinth bricks below DPC level are in place and the site is looking good so far!  

Class Q conversions

The regulations for conversions of agricultural buildings to residential under permitted development are being changed in April. The proposals are expected to relax the rules and allow for the conversion of up to five dwellings, with a larger footprint, rather than three. Details available in an announcement on the Planning Portal here: Class Q announcement

Planning Permission

Planning permission has recently been obtained for the proposed two storey rear extension and side extension to a house in Thorndon. The Clients are very pleased with the outcome and look forward to Let's Design Architecture completing the building regulations drawings in the near future.

Completion of conversion project

Works recently completed on a conversion project in Saxmundham. The existing townhouse was converted into two separate dwellings, including the re-building of a previously demolished lean-to.

The original property would have been two town houses, which had previously been converted into a single dwelling; the layout of which didn't work and the appearance was outdated. The original sash window had been removed and replaced with a poor quality casement window, which looked out of place on the street scene. The property lends itself well to being two dwellings as it was formerly, so the developer wanted to restore it as such.

Works to the frontage included the provision of a new front door and window, re-instating the original appearance, along with carefully chosen brickwork to suit. A new party wall was added to separate the dwellings and the internal layouts were carefully designed to maximize space. 

The developer is very happy with the finished houses.

Approval for nine dwellings in Benhall

The reserved matters application for a proposal of nine properties at Benhall has recently been approved by Suffolk Coastal District Council. Let's Design Architecture is delighted with the outcome of the application and looks forward to watching the properties being built in the near future. 

Planning fees 20% increase

The Government has recently introduced a new fee scale for Planning Applications, increasing the fees by 20%. 

These new regulations also include the right for them to charge a fee for applications for planning permission related to the removal of permitted development rights through Article 4 directions or by condition, where this was previously free of charge.

The Planning Portal fee calculator provides the latest fees for planning applications.

Contact Zoe at Let's Design Architecture if you need drawings and to make an application for planning or building regulations. 

Block plans

Two new build houses - preparation for planning application. 

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Today I’ve been working up a block plan to show my Clients their proposals in 3D. They wanted to know whether the two new build properties had enough space between them, to make sure the bungalow wasn’t being overshadowed by the house. The basic 3D model helped visually to convey the context of the site. They found them really useful. 

 

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Permitted Development

People often ask me if they can do things without planning permission. The answer is sometimes yes, but it is always a useful exercise to check with the planning department first and get something in writing from them. They have introduced a pre-application submission process, to check whether permission is required and also whether the proposals are likely to be considered favourably upon submission. 

The good news is that there is information available on the government website which helps with ascertaining whether your development is permitted under PD rights or not. There are different classes of permitted development and the PD order is available here: legislation.gov.uk

If the document seems a bit of a daunting read, there is a very useful 'interactive house' available on the planning portal which makes life simpler. 

However, what is often unknown is whether permitted development rights apply to your property or whether they have been removed. Some properties when they were built had permitted development rights removed and some had the permitted development rights removed at a time when a previous extension was added. Check the planning permission(s) relevant to your property to see which classes may have been removed, as you may be able to do certain things under permitted development and certain other things you will need planning permission for. 

In the case of listed buildings and buildings within conservation areas, it is most likely that you will require planning permission or listed building consent to carry out any works to the property or the buildings/walls within the curtilage of the property. Again it is always best to check with the planning department before undertaking any works. 

Of course, Let's Design Architecture is here to help if you need any assistance with your proposals! 

Feeling blue... architecture

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Today I am in London, which is always architecturally interesting. I have just driven here on a day trip to the Royal London Hospital. I didn’t know what to expect, I have been to a few hospitals around London with my parents and usually they are a mismatch of architectural styles, using converted buildings with new elements added on. I was quite impressed to find a completely contemporary building with a very smart blue mosaic facade and modern glass atrium. I only went to the second floor, but from here you can see that the hospital architects have made the most of the views of London and the famous ‘guerkin’ at 30 St Mary Axe. 

The interior is very clean, open and well thought out.  I should really have ventured to the top floor to get the most of the view, but I didn’t think about it at the time. Maybe if I come back I will get a picture from the top!

 

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